Not Another Brisket!

I just couldn’t help myself. It was just before the Passover holiday and I had planned to make Joan Nathan’s delicious brisket recipe but lo and behold the recipe calls for soy sauce and mustard-2 ingredients that an Ashkenazi Jew cannot eat on Passover as they are considered kitniyot. I was in a panic-I had my heart set on making THIS brisket for seder night. Well there is nothing like Google to save the day. I found this wonderful adapted recipe from The Spruce.  As suggested, I substituted garlic for the mustard powder. I marinated the brisket overnight and put it in the oven at 5:30 AM on Passover eve. The brisket was ready by 10:30 AM. I sliced it cold-put it back in the oven before serving.

What can I say it tasted like BUTTA (pareve of course)!

Enjoy.

Gio

Another Brisket

For those of you who have been following my blog, you may get the feeling that I am “brisket obsessed”-well I am. I don’t have a large repertoire of  recipes I make. I am not that adventurous when it comes to my cooking. I always feel safe staying with my “tried and true”recipes, using the cookbooks that I feel comfortable with like my dear friend Rachelle’s which features many of the comfort foods of my youth.

But, my son Yehuda, the total opposite of me when it comes to cooking is always looking for a finding new ways to make our comfort foods. This time he introduced me to a new spin on my favorite-brisket. This Joan Nathan recipe is just spectacular and sumptuous-only some of the adjectives I can best use to describe how indescribably delicious the meat was. I admit that I was a bit skeptical about the coke/red wine mix but it worked. Since I made it before Shabbat I don’t have a photo but you will have to take my word for it.

Click here for this absolutely amazing recipe.Image result for brisket with red wine and coke

Trying to get Dessert Right

Living in Israel exposes us to many different types of people from various cultures. Over the past few years the French have moved to the neighborhood. Where my other sons had many Anglo friends, my youngest hangs with the French. He recently returned from ah shabbat meal at one of his friends and remarked that they really invest in the desserts. He said the meal was ok but the desserts were just AMAZING. I realize that I invest so much time in cooking the shabbat meal that my desserts do fall flat. One night I was on the phone with a friend from Boston. She described the baked apples she had just put in the oven. My mother in law used to make baked apples but I had never tried it.

Remembering all of the maple syrup I have, I googled baked apples with maple syrup and a few recipes popped up.

I decided to just try my own thing and here is what I did:

I tried both red apples and granny smiths. Core the apples and cut the bottom a bit so that they can stand flat. I filled the core with raisins. Place the apples in a pyrex dish. I then drizzled them with maple syrup. Into a preheated oven 375 F for 45 min (check the apples and if they are not soft may need a few more minutes)

The apples were divine. The granny smiths were a bit more tart than the red apples so keep that in mind.

You can always top the baked apples with whipped cream, ice cream etc and a perfect dessert! So I have now taken my shabbat meal to the next level-ending with a great dessert!

Baked apples